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Facebook Privacy Notice

July 25th, 2012 by Troy Newport


Another Urban Legend

I thought after this silly soliloquy started getting passed around Facebook and there was a collective belly-laugh from every reputable blogger and media source on the planet that this thing would quickly go away.  Nope.  Apparently it’s destined to be as sexy and pervasive as Lolcats.  I continue to see people posting the following on their Facebook pages,  believing it somehow protects their “privacy”:

PRIVACY NOTICE: Warning – any person and/or institution and/or Agent and/or Agency of any governmental structure including but not limited to the United States Federal Government also using or monitoring/using this website or any of its associated websites, you do NOT have my permission to utilize any of my profile information nor any of the content contained herein including, but not limited to my photos, and/or the comments made about my photos or any other “picture” art posted on my profile.

You are hereby notified that you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing, disseminating, or taking any other action against me with regard to this profile and the contents herein. The foregoing prohibitions also apply to your employee , agent , student or any personnel under your direction or control.

The contents of this profile are private and legally privileged and confidential information, and the violation of my personal privacy is punishable by law. UCC 1-103 1-308 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED WITHOUT PREJUDICE

Sorry to burst your bubble people, but only if it were so easy!  When you signed up for a Facebook account you agreed to their Terms.  Every time Facebook updates their Terms and you continue to use Facebook you are agreeing to their Terms.  Facebook explicitly says they will comply with any law enforcement requests (even if those requests come from outside the United States).  No post on your wall or picture you post in your Photos area will change any of that.

So the number one rule to follow when using social media websites:  consider everything you post online as public domain, and don’t post anything you wouldn’t want your mother (or future employer) to see! 

 

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